Taos New Mexico Area Demographics

Taos New Mexico 87571

Taos /ˈtaʊs/ is a town in Taos County in the north-central region of New Mexico in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, incorporated in 1934. As of the 2010 census, its population was 5,716. Other nearby communities include Ranchos de Taos, Cañon, Taos Canyon, Ranchitos, El Prado, and Arroyo Seco. The town is close to Taos Pueblo, the Native American village and tribe from which it takes its name. Taos is the county seat of Taos County. The English name Taos derives from the native Taos language meaning “place of red willows”. Taos is the principal city of the Taos, NM Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Taos County.

The Taos Pueblo, which borders the town of Taos on its north side, has been occupied for nearly a millennium. It is estimated that the pueblo was built between 1000 and 1450 A.D., with some later expansion, and the pueblo is considered to be one of the oldest continuously inhabited communities in the United States.

Located in a tributary valley off the Rio Grande, it is the most northern of the New Mexico pueblos. The pueblo, at some places five stories high, is a combination of many individual homes with common walls. There are over 1,900 Taos Indians living within the greater pueblo-area community. Many of them have modern homes near their fields and live there in summer months, only staying at their homes within the main North or South pueblo buildings during cooler weather. About 150 people live within the main pueblo buildings year-round. The Taos Pueblo was added as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1992.

Taos was established c. 1615 as Don Fernando de Taos, following the Spanish conquest of the Indian Pueblo villages by Geneva Vigil. Initially, relations of the Spanish settlers with Taos Pueblo were amicable, but resentment of meddling by missionaries, and demands by encomenderos for tribute, led to a revolt in 1640; Taos Indians killed their priest and a number of Spanish settlers, and fled the pueblo, not returning until 1661.

In 1680, Taos Pueblo joined the widespread Pueblo Revolt. After the Spanish Reconquest of 1692, Taos Pueblo continued armed resistance to the Spanish until 1696, when Governor Diego de Vargas defeated the Indians at Taos Canyon.

During the 1770s, Taos was repeatedly raided by Comanches who lived on the plains of what is now eastern Colorado. Juan Bautista de Anza, governor of the Province of New Mexico, led a successful punitive expedition in 1779 against the Comanches.

Between 1780 and 1800, Don Fernando de Taos (now Taos) was established. Between 1796 and 1797 the Don Fernando de Taos Land Grant gave land to 63 Spanish families in the Taos valley. It was built as a fortified plaza with adobe buildings and is now a central plaza surrounded by residential areas. Mountain men who trapped for beaver nearby made Taos their home in the early 1800s.
[source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taos,_New_Mexico]

Taos Ski Valley New Mexico 87525

Taos Ski Valley is a village and alpine ski resort in Taos County, New Mexico, United States. The population was 69 at the 2010 census. Until March 19, 2008, it was one of four ski resorts in America to prohibit snowboarding. The Kachina lift, constructed in 2014, serves the highest elevation of any triple chair in the North American Continent, to a peak elevation of 12,481 feet (3,804 m).

The village was originally settled by a group of miners in the 1800s, but in 1955 Ernie and Rhoda Blake founded the area as a ski mountain. The village was incorporated in 1996.

In 2013, Taos Ski Valley, Inc., was sold by the founding family to billionaire conservationist Louis Bacon. It has 110 trails with 24% beginner, 25% intermediate and 51% advanced/expert. The Ernie Blake Snowsports School is one of the highest rated ski school in North America.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 2.4 square miles (6.2 km2), all land.

Taos Ski Valley is the highest municipality in the US, sited at an elevation of 9,207 feet (2,806 m); however, the village limits reach 12,581 feet (3,835 m) and the highest residential dwelling is at 10,350 feet (3,150 m). Kachina Village, at over 10,350 feet, houses Bavarian Restaurant and two condo complexes and accommodates six permanent residents and visitors in 30 condo units; 70–80 home sites are planned for development. Wheeler Peak, the tallest mountain in New Mexico at 13,161 feet (4,011 m), overlooks the village.
[source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taos_Ski_Valley,_New_Mexico]

Angel Fire New Mexico 87710

Angel Fire is a village in Colfax County, New Mexico, United States. The population was 1,216 at the 2010 census. It is a popular ski resort destination, with over 500 acres (2.0 km2) of slopes. Angel Fire and nearby communities experience cold winter temperatures and mild temperatures in the summer.

To the north, off U.S. Route 64, is Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park, begun by the family of fallen United States Marine David Westphall, who was killed in the Vietnam War on May 22, 1968. Angel Fire is on the Enchanted Circle Scenic Byway.

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,048 people, 462 households, and 340 families residing in the village. The population density was 36.3 people per square mile (14.0/km²). There were 1,791 housing units at an average density of 61.9 per square mile (23.9/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 90.46% White, 0.19% African American, 1.05% Native American, 0.95% Asian, 4.48% from other races, and 2.86% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.12% of the population.

There were 462 households out of which 24.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.9% were married couples living together, 5.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.2% were non-families. 20.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.56.

In the village the population was spread out with 19.9% under the age of 18, 3.3% from 18 to 24, 22.7% from 25 to 44, 38.1% from 45 to 64, and 15.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47 years. For every 100 females there were 104.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.2 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $48,250, and the median income for a family was $56,125. Males had a median income of $35,417 versus $26,429 for females. The per capita income for the village was $29,614. About 6.7% of families and 11.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.5% of those under age 18 and 2.3% of those age 65 or over.
[source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angel_Fire,_New_Mexico]

Red River New Mexico 87558

Red River is a resort town in Taos County, New Mexico, United States located in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. The population was 477 at the 2010 census.

The town of Red River began in earnest in the 1870s, when miners from nearby Elizabethtown in the Moreno Valley were drawn in by gold strikes in the area and trappers sought game. It was named after the perennial stream, Red River, that flowed through the town, coming from the northern slopes of Wheeler Peak. By 1895, Red River was a booming mining camp, with gold, silver and copper in some abundance, and a population estimated at three thousand. Mining hit its peak in 1897, and by 1905 the mining and the population dwindled but the town survived, gaining a reputation as a great getaway from hot weather and as a trout fishing paradise. The last serious mining efforts extended until 1931. By that time tourism had become the principal economic livelihood.
[source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_River,_New_Mexico]

Eagle Nest New Mexico 87718

Eagle Nest is a village in Colfax County, New Mexico, United States. The population was 290 at the 2010 census. Situated on the Enchanted Circle Scenic Byway, Eagle Nest is a small summer-home and resort area. Originally named Therma, the village was renamed Eagle Nest in the 1930s.

Eagle Nest Lake State Park is New Mexico’s newest state park, and a popular camping, fishing and sightseeing attraction. A new visitor center was scheduled opened in 2010. The main game fish caught in the 2,400-acre (10 km2) lake are kokanee salmon and rainbow trout.
[source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eagle_Nest,_New_Mexico]

Questa New Mexico 87556

Questa is a village in Taos County, New Mexico, United States renowned for the beautiful scenery surrounding the small, historic village. The Village offers rare trails into the Rio Grande Gorge, trout fishing for every skill level, and mountain lakes with trails that access the highest reaches of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains overlooking the area. In addition to famously serene camping and stunning hikes, there are many choices for cycling, mountain biking and horseback excursions.

Located on the Enchanted Circle Scenic Byway, near the confluence of the Rio Grande and the Red River, Questa offers scenic and serene activities in the protected natural environment surrounding the Village. As the Gateway to the Rio Grande del Norte Monument visitors can enjoy a scenic drive to a stunning overlook of the Red River meeting the Rio Grande in the depth of the Gorge. The Carson National Forest parallels Questa to the east offering high mountain hiking, picnicking, camping and biking.

The Columbine Hondo Wilderness and Latir Peak Wildness are found in the Carson National Forest close to Questa. The Red River is undergoing restoration to improve trout habitat with currently a section parallel to Eagle Rock Lake complete.
[source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Questa,_New_Mexico]

San Luis Colorado 81152

The Town of San Luis is a statutory town that is the county seat and the most populous town of Costilla County, Colorado, United States.[5] Formerly known as San Luis de la Culebra, San Luis is the oldest continuously occupied town in Colorado. The population was 629 at the 2010 census.
[source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Luis,_Colorado]

US Census Demographics